Basic Sources of Economic Statistics

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There are a few good collections of resources for those needing economic data, statistics, etc. Rather than re-create the wheel, I will list a few of the better lists.
Subject: Reference

There are a few good collections of resources for those needing economic data, statistics, etc. Rather than re-create the wheel, I will list a few of the better lists.

Princeton University Library – Basic Sources of United States Economic Statistics

Princeton University Library offers this selective guide to sources of United
States macro-level economic statistics. Aside from economic indicators and financial data, most data does not exist in electronic format.
Historical data in electronic format prior to 1950 is rare. Most governmental links provide current data only. Separate detailed guides are
available for Finance,
International Trade,
Health and Medicine,
Environment, and
Sports statistics
and many more.

Also check out the library’s Economics Homepage as a good starting point for
what is available via the Web.

Resources for Economists

An extensive human-edited guide of economics-related information on the web. Sponsored by the American Economics Association
and edited by Bill Goffe. It lists more than 2,000 resources in 97 sections and sub-sections available on the Internet of interest to academic and practicing
economists, and those interested in economics.

U.S. Department of Commerce – Bureau of Economic Analysis

The Bureau of Economic Analysis is an agency of the Department of Commerce. Along with the Census Bureau and
STAT-USA, BEA is part of the Department’s Economics and Statistics Administration. The mission of BEA is to produce and disseminate accurate,
timely, relevant, and cost-effective economic accounts statistics that provide government, businesses, households, and individuals with a
comprehensive, up-to-date picture of economic activity. BEA’s national, regional, and international economic accounts present basic information
on such key issues as U.S. economic growth, regional economic development, and the Nation’s position in the world economy.

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